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Monday, October 27, 2014

* Wordweavers Short Story Shortlisted!

Read my short story "Candy" currently longlisted in the Wordweavers Short Story Competition 2014 - http://wordweavers.in/2014_short_story_shortlist.html

And my poem "Behind the Curtain" is also shortlisted in the Poetry category.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Thursday, August 21, 2014

* The Leaky Pot - Winner!

My short story "He Stooped but not to Conquer" is the winner of "Stranger Than Fiction-The Leaky Pot Short Story Competition." Read the story here:

Monday, July 28, 2014

* After Bashabi Fraser's Lecture!

After Bashabi Fraser’s Lecture
The lecture’s over, the embers remain:
Echoes of the Ganga remain,
Remain the echoes of the Tay-
An hour freed from the prose of life,
Dedicated to poetry,
In a world of Ukraines and Palestines.
Words fill the rivulets of ideas
While seeking forms to flow into:
The dynamics of arrivals,
And the stasis of absences,
Chaotic and homebound, like boys
Distributing at the mouth of the school,
The mind resounds the words from its replenished store
In tune with Kathak and Holi on Scottish shore.
Thank you Saptarshi Mallick for inviting me to Prof. Bashabi Fraser's lecture at St. Xavier's Hall on 21st July, 2014.

Thursday, June 26, 2014

* Hurrah!

Applying for Fulbright-Nehru Postdoctoral Research Fellowship on South Asian American Literature.
Prof. Rajini Srikanth has agreed to mentor me in my postdoctoral work at UMass Boston if I get the grant. 

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

* Diaspora, Migration and Literature (CU and SUNY)

This year I have been assisting and participating in an online class (via Email, Facebook, Skype and Blog) on Diaspora Literature conducted jointly by the English Departments of Calcutta University, Kolkata, India and State University of New York, Oswego, USA.  Read my post "Bias Against Humanities in Diasporic Indian Families" in the our blog Diaspora, Migration and Literature at

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

* Estrade Magazine & JNU Viva

My short story "Coming Back / Going Back" is published in the Diaspora issue of Estrade Magazine (Volume 2, Issue 1, March 2014).

Dr. Santanu Majumdar conducted PhD Viva of Sakshi Chanana at JNU. Here are a couple of glimpses from that event:

Sunday, March 30, 2014

* Cha: An Asian Literary Journal

My poem "Aphasia" is one of the highly commended poems of "Void" Poetry Contest and is published in Cha: An Asian Literary Journal's Sixth Anniversary Issue (Issue 23, March 2014). 

Here is the link to my poem:


Saturday, February 22, 2014

* Film-making!

I attended a Documentary film-making workshop organized by British Council in association with Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute and this is the two-minute documentary I along with my team members, Hoimashree, Shahnawaz and Rohan made on the theme "Character". Watch it!

Here is the link to all the films made during the workshop:  

Thank you Anand Gandhi and Recyclewala Films for sending me a signed DVD set of Ship of Theseus.
Is it the same ship? My answer: As far as there is continuity of consciousness there is continuity of identity. From Locke's memory criterion to Parfit's successive selves, it is the continuity of consciousness that seems to define identity. The planks of Theseus's ship are gradually removed but not all at once, so there is a continuity of identity. More so if human beings are involved as they have consciousness. Then it becomes a matter of mental acceptance just as there is a need of bodily acceptance of a foreign implant. Once such acceptance is achieved, despite structural and functional divergence, identity is maintained. So the ship is the same otherwise every moment it is a new ship for every moment something changes. Just like a river whose water changes constantly but it remains the same river.

Sunday, January 5, 2014

* At the launch of Pegasus volume on Reading and Writing Difference & Pravasi Bharatiya Divas Special in Diplomatist

The formal book release of Pegasus volume on Reading and Writing Difference: Gender and Literature (Ed. Sanjukta Das, ISBN 9789380542560, Kolkata: Monfakira, 2013, Rs. 150) took place on 4th January, 2014, at Bhawanipur Education Society. Pegasus (www.pegasus-press.net) and especially its steering head Prof. Salil Biswas have been striving for the last thirteen years in producing volumes on research work of academic merit in the form of journals and books. This latest volume consists of excellent research articles by academicians as well as Sanjukta Das's review article of the book Media, Gender and Popular Culture (co-authored by Sanjukta Dasgupta, Sudeshna Chakraborty and Dipankar Sinha). The Pegasus volume was launched by Dr. Paromita Chakravarti, Director of School of Women’s Studies, Jadavpur University. She also spoke on “Gender and Politics” delineating the history of women’s movement from the time of Mary Wollstonecraft to the modern feminism of today. She showed how issues of class, caste, race, economy, and other categories of double marginalization fracture the binary of gender difference. More so in the current consideration of issues of sexuality, gender is seen as a spectrum rather than being constricted by definition in terms of difference.

This lecture was followed by a group discussion on “Gender and Literature” by the panelists comprising young researchers Jashomati Ghose, Sanghita Sanyal, Swaty Mitra and Gargi Talapatra. They spoke variously on representation of gender in fairy tales, women’s writing in England, the coloured women’s literature in the US and gender representations in Indian literature. The audience enthusiastically participated in the discussion especially on the issue of representation of Little Red Riding Hood, which underwent transformation from an oral erotic tale of how the girl seduced the wolf and escaped to a Victorian tale of being rescued by a male hunter. One member of the audience pointed out that in a retelling of the tale in the TV series “Once Upon a Time” it is the girl who is transformed into the wolf. There was heated debate on  whether the whole oeuvre of fairy tales should be rewritten to make them gender sensitive and suitably consumable for the children of the new generation. Dr. Chakravarti intervened to say that instead of rewriting fairy tales in an age where all sorts of information is freely available it is advisable that children should be taught to read correctly. Sensitivity has to be inculcated rather than censorship imposed.

Dr. Chakravarti had earlier narrated an anecdote about the 2006 Autonomous Women's Conference where malejournalists were banned from entering because it was a women-only event. But interestingly the labouring class who worked to put up the event were all males. She pointed out that the underprivileged male workers were somehow not seen in terms of their masculinity whereas the male journalists were not treated similarly because of their privileged status. Then there was the issue of LGBTs. There was the question of whom to include - whether those who are biologically male by feel psychologically female or those who are biologically female but feel psychologically male. She then legitimately raised the perplexing question - Who is the subject of the discipline of “gender” or just who is a “woman”?

This situation made me think of a discussion I once had in Calcutta University with some fellow researchers on whether those Dalits who belong to the creamy layer and have attained economic and social status need the privilege of positive discrimination. Then came the question of Dalit consciousness. All subalterns who have passed through years of discrimination inherit this consciousness which often may not seem apparent. Gender consciousness may not be apparent when a privileged-class woman is in front of a poor male stall owner on the street. But it will be apparent if it is the middle of the night and the street is abandoned. It becomes an issue of power and not necessarily of strength but a consciousness of dominance and marginalization. So to answer the question “Who is a woman?” we just have to take two individuals from the gender spectrum and whoever is potentially the vulnerable of the pair in a given situation is the representative woman and the right subject of the discipline of gender.
~~~~~~~~~~
 


Read my article "The Indian Diasporic Creative: Literature to Music" in the January 2014 issue (volume 2 issue 1) of Diplomatist magazine released on the occasion of the twelfth edition of Pravasi Bharatiya Divas in New Delhi, 7th-9th January, 2014. 


Sunday, December 1, 2013

* Prof. Deirdre Coleman's Visit and Amita Dutt's Kathak!

Prof. Deirdre Coleman, Robert Wallace Chair of English and Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Arts, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne, visited the English Department of Calcutta University on 25th-26th November, 2013. She delivered the lecture titled "Keats, India and the Vale of Soulmaking" and interacted with the faculty and researchers to explore avenues of collaboration between the universities of Melbourne and Calcutta. She informed the researchers about the availability of scholarships for study in Australia. She also released the latest books of Dr. Santanu Majumdar, Sumita Naskar and Satyabrata Dinda published by Dasgupta and Sons.

Prof. Coleman with Dr. Majumdar
 ************************************************

Visit http://www.thestatesman.net/news/27417-kathak-repertoire-at-its-best.html (The Statesman, Kolkata, Arts Supplement - "Kathak repertoire at its best") for Tapati Chowdhurie's review of Amita Dutt & Troupe's riveting performance of DURGA at Derozio Hall on 24th November, 2013.


Saturday, November 16, 2013

* Countering a Biased and Hostile Book Review!

In the November 2013 issue of the Bulletin of the Ramakrishna Mission Institute of Culture (ISSN 09712755, Vol. LXIV, No. 11) I read a review of Dr. Santanu Majumdar’s book titled Dazzled by a Thousand Suns: The Impact of Western Philosophy on Indian Interpretations of The Gita. The reviewer, Swarup Puri, takes a biased view and a rather hostile tone towards the book. The reviewer starts by saying that this book is “neither a monograph on religion nor Indian philosophy” but the author does not claim it to be so. The monograph is on a specific and narrow area of research as defined by the title. The reviewer writes that the author has used “incoherent quotations and excerpts from different writings”, which raises the question whether the quotations and excerpts are themselves incoherent or are used incoherently. Then the reviewer goes on to claim that the author is trying to attribute that the “dazzling sun” is Occidental wisdom, whereas on the contrary, the author explicitly states in the book that the title is taken Chapter 11 of The Gita, where Krishna favours Arjuna with “biswaroop darshan”and it is more than apparent what the dazzling sun represents.

It seems that the reviewer has read a very different book than what I have read or if the same book then perhaps with a sinister motive. Moreover, he reads selectively. For example, he reads in the book that Western education opened the eyes of the Indian students but he does not read in that same book that sometimes Western education was beguiling and misleading. The title of the review, “Playing a colonial tune”, is ironical since the reviewer seems to suggest that instead of taking balanced view the author should have taken a prejudiced view against Western philosophy and thereby promote “colonialism” in the reverse. There is no justification that, since many colonial writers were biased against Indian texts, Indian writers should be biased against Western texts especially when the era of decolonisation and revanchism is over.

The reviewer states that the author “bravely puts forward a thesis that Swami Vivekananda was a ‘proselytizing missionary’ and a ‘ferocious propagandist of Hinduism’ (p. 65)”, which seems to suggest pejorative connotations to the words “proselytizing” and “propagandist” in the given context. Whereas when we read the full sentence from where these excerpts are taken then if appears just the opposite: "Disciple of the saint Ramakrishna, proselytizing missionary and founder of the Ramakrishna Mission, a fierce and perhaps even ferocious propagandist of Hinduism abroad, especially in the United States, where he took the Parliament of Religions in Chicago by storm in 1893, Vivekananda shows with the most ancient and most important Indian commentator of The Gita, Shankara, a genius for organization and founding of religious orders" (p. 65). This is how the reviewer has interpreted positive words into negative meanings by being selective and biased. It is perhaps his inferiority complex that he thinks that Swami Vivekananda’s co-religionists have to be apologetic about him being a Hindu missionary and hide the fact about this part of his life and work. I wonder now whose mind is beset with colonial hangover!

The reviewer also says that there is no distinction between interpretation and commentary in Indian philosophy and the author makes unnecessary fuss about it. The author states that the distinction is not about being profound or shallow but rather that the interpreter sees the text as a philosophical document and the commentator sees it as a religious document i.e. God’s words to man. It is in this sense only that Shankara, Ramanuja, Madhva and Sridhar Swami are categorized as commentators and Bankim Chandra, Sri Aurobindo, Gandhi, Tagore, Tilak, Swami Vivekananda and Radhakrishnan are categorized as interpreters. But the reviewer takes affront at this categorization according to approach and go on to say that the author’s understanding of The Gita and Indian thinkers is poor and the monograph is just an intellectual exercise without genuine desire to appreciate the importance of our great thinkers. If the reviewer was looking for a discussion on the impact of Indian philosophy on Indian interpretations of The Gita  in a book with the given title then he was certainly looking in the wrong place. Or perhaps no one cared to explain the title of the book to him.

Friday, October 25, 2013

* KNIGHTHOOD, APU and CERTIFICATE!

Congratulations to Professor Chinmoy Guha, who received a second Knighthood from the French government. Here is the link to my blog post when he got his first Knighthood: http://amitss6.blogspot.in/2010/04/memoir-as-tribute.html. And here is Prof. Guha's blog link: http://chinmoyguha.blogspot.in/
The Telegraph (Kolkata)
Michelle Rao and Lisa, graduate students from Azusa Pacific University, California, who met me  during their Kolkata visit. And thanks to Dr. Richard Slimbach, Professor of Global Studies at APU, for recommending my name.
Lisa and Michelle
And finally my Wordweavers Certificate arrived.




Tuesday, September 17, 2013

* HoD and The Lowland

 

 My PhD Supervisor, Dr. Santanu Majumdar, is now the Head of the Department of English at Calcutta University. Here he is in his office room with some researchers.





Jhumpa Lahiri's The Lowland is shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. 


Monday, August 26, 2013

* News: Amita Dutt, Anand Gandhi and Jhumpa Lahiri

Prof. Amita Dutt reminisces about Calcutta in Dainik Statesman  (25th August 2013 - Sunday) "Shanto Theke Kolahole Dakshin Kolkatar Palabodol"

Ship Of Theseus director Anand Gandhi recently visited Kolkata and was in conversation with Bedabrata Pain (Dir. of "Chittagong") and Q (Dir. of "Tasher Desh") on 16th August at Crossword. They talked about "Freedom, Independence and Independent Films." 

The film is still running in Delhi in its 6th week.


Visit:
A WRITER'S ROOM (PHOTOGRAPHS By JOHN SPINK)

A view of Rome, a pristine computer screen, a photograph of Basquiat, an I.B.M. 196c typewriter, the ghost of another author. For these writers — each of whom releases a new book this fall — all they need to inspire is within these walls.
 http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/08/25/t-magazine/25writers-rooms.html

JONATHAN LETHEM - JULIAN BARNES - JHUMPA LAHIRI - EDWIDGE DANTICAT - RICHARD DAWKINS - JESMYN WARD

Monday, July 22, 2013

* Wordweavers, DESI: La Revue and Sunetra Gupta!

My short story, "The Story of Nan Phu", has been shortlisted in the Wordweavers Writing Contest 2013. Visit, read and review - http://wordweavers.in/short_story_2013_shortlisted_13.html

Conference paper, written in collaboration with Bhawana Jain of Nice Sophia-Antipolis University (France), published.

"Food in the Culture of India and the Indian Diaspora: An Analysis through the Selected Works of Anita Desai." DESI: La Revue No. 2 (Diasporas: Etudes Des Singularities Indiennes – Circulations). Eds. Jean-Francois Baillon and Anthony Goreau-Ponceaud. ISBN: 978-2-86781-870-7. BORDEAUX: Presses Universitaires de Bordeaux, 2013, Pp. 171-89.


Can be had from - http://pub.u-bordeaux3.fr/index.php/revues/desi-la-revue/circulations-desi-n-3.html

Sunetra Gupta included in Curie gallery - http://www.telegraphindia.com/1130721/jsp/frontpage/story_17140478.jsp#.UexY8qy_Guk

Friday, June 28, 2013

* The Groove!

In its sesquicentennial year celebrations, St. Anthony's High School today hosted The Groove: The Inter-School Dance Competition in the newly refurbished auditorium rechristened after Fr. Camille Limbourg. The Chief Guest on the occasion was Prof. Amita Dutt, the renowned Kathak exponent and Uday Shankar Professor of Dance at Rabindra Bharati University. 

The winning school in the solo category was the host and my alma mater St. Anthony's High School and in the group category it was Meghmala Roy Education Centre. In the solo category Loyola High School came second and Meghmala Roy Education Centre came third. In the group category St. Anthony's School came second and Loyola High School came third. In the solo category the students could perform any dance form but to the music of A. R. Rahman. In the group category the students could perform any dance form but adhering to the theme of "Seasons".

Prof. Amita Dutt with the Headmaster and the Judges

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

* A Poem

The Swing

I see simmering forms in the void:
Two little boys with their mother -
That evening when the Nor-Westers came
And the raindrops kept splashing on the floor.
The electric bulb curdled the gloomy
Atmosphere that had enveloped the room.
They now approach the door and instantly
Again recede. My heart overcomes
With a sense of deja vu whenever
A room, a swing, a rain, a cloud I see.

Friday, April 26, 2013

* ORATIO 2013!

Today St. Anthony's High School held the first of its scheduled inter-school events to mark its sesquicentennial year of foundation. Oratio: the Inter-School Elocution Competition 2013 was a grand success. The topic of the contest was "Conserving our Heritage is as Important as Building our Future". Mr. Murli Punjabi was the sponsor of the event.

Mr. Sanjay Wadvani, OBE, the British Deputy High Commissioner was the Chief Guest. The judges of the event were Prof. Tapati Gupta (Former Head of the Dept. of English, Calcutta University), Prof. Sobha Chattopadhyay (former Head of the Dept. of English, Jadavpur University) and Prof. Shila Niyogi (Asso. Professor of English at Jogmaya Devi College).

A total of 19 schools participated in the contest (St. Anthony's, St. James, Don Bosco, Calcutta Boys,  La Martiniere Girls, Frank Anthony, Loreto Elliot Rd, Loreto Entally, Loreto Dharamtalla, St. Aloysius, St. Mary's, Birla High, Chowringhee High, St. Augustine, South City International, Meghmala Roy Edu, Ling Liang, Saifi Hall, St. Thomas Boys Khidderpore).

Ujaan Ganguly of St. James came 1st, Oishik Bandyopadhyay of Calcutta Boys came 2nd and Sparsh Agarwal of Don Bosco came 3rd (Sparsh was last year's winner). The Championship Prize went to St. James for having the best total of the two participants combined (last year's champion was Don Bosco). St. Anthony's Pradipta Dey came a commendable 4th.


Chief Guest
Judges















P.S. Here is a newspaper report on last year's Oratio. This year's newspaper reports are awaited.
THE TELEGRAPH (Metro) reports today on 150 years celebration of St. Anthony's High School- http://www.telegraphindia.com/1130604/jsp/calcutta/story_16969277.jsp#.Ua39t9i_Guk

Last week my school also had a gala inaugural function of its Sesquicentennial Year of Foundation where Dr. Sudarshan Ghosh Dastidar, Minister in charge of Environmental Affairs, W. B. Govt., was the Chief Guest.
My school has also launched its website where ex-students can register - http://stanthonyshighschool.in/

Thursday, March 14, 2013

* Reprint and Chinmoy Guha!

 Prof. Chinmoy Guha delivers the inaugural lecture at the First World Book Fair in Mauritius.
ANANDABAZAR PATRIKA - 22-04-2013
For details visit here.
 ******************************
"The Spiritual Sense of Alienation in Diasporic Life: Reading Anita Desai, Bharati Mukherjee, Sunetra Gupta and Jhumpa Lahiri". Indian English Fiction: Postmodern Literary Sensibility. Ed. Vishwanath Bite. ISBN: 9788172736774. New Delhi: Authorspress, 2012, Pp.  129-38 (Re-print from The Criterion journal article)


Wednesday, February 27, 2013

* Sesquicentennial of my Alma Mater!

My alma mater is celebrating the sesquicentennial year of its foundation. I was in the school when we celebrated the 125th year and now it's the 150th year! Here is the 150th year logo:

Like the Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/St-Anthonys-High-School-Kolkata/246642305471098

Join the Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/503998469651449/

Visit the refurbished Anthonian Literary Club Blog: http://antlit.blogspot.in/


Thursday, January 31, 2013

* KLM and Midnight's Children!

Prof. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak in conversation with Prof. Chinmoy Guha at the Kolkata Literary Meet

 
 Rahul Bose in conversation with Nilanjana S. Roy at the AfterWords session titled Midnight Magic at KLM

Thursday, December 27, 2012

* Shoptodina


Call-for-contributions for the inaugural issue
(Coming Soon - Hurry!)

Shoptodina Magazine (English)

Vision: Shoptodina is a magazine of creative writing and literature with focus on Bengal. Its main objective is to channelize creative talent to showcase Bengal. In order to do so the magazine will explore and exploit the creative talent in Bengal as well as encourage people living outside Bengal to give creative output to their experiences of Bengal. The magazine will have sections on poetry, drama, fiction, essays, memoir, travelogue, interviews and translations from Bengali to English apart from regular columns and features. The magazine intends to have bi-monthly publication that is six issues every year. The language of the magazine will be English. There will also be a sister magazine in Bengali of the same name, though not twins since the content will be different. Both the magazines will be published online as webzines on the website http://www.shoptodina.org and will have print avatars if and when adequate funding is available.

Nomenclature: Shoptodina refers to a grand fleet of merchant ships from ancient and early medieval Bengal. “Shopto” means seven in Bengali. There are also reasons to believe that Shoptodina could have been named after Shoptogram, the ancient harbour of Bengal. “Dina”, as in Shoptodina, is an Austric word, and it refers to the most ancient group of native inhabitants of Bengal. All we know is that we really don’t know how far “dina” goes back in history. Shoptodina thus stands as a symbol for the Bengali identity as well as the global reach and spread of the Bengalis and their culture.
Submission guidelines: We solicit contributions from everyone and our only eligibility criterion is that the piece submitted has to be related in some way to Bengal and its people, history, geography, culture, literature, art, etc. Since the magazine is in English, the contributions must be in English. All contributions must be original and must not have been previously published in any form. The contributions will be subject to editorial approval for maintaining literary quality and focus of the magazine but the views expressed in them will be solely that of the writers themselves. The copyright of every contribution will remain with the writer but the writer will grant Shoptodina the first publication, archiving and subsequent non-exclusive publication rights. If later on the same piece is to be published elsewhere then Shoptodina has to be acknowledged as its first publisher. Though no prior permission is needed it is courteous for the writer to inform Shoptodina of it. Shoptodina is unable to pay contributors any monetary compensation but will always be grateful for their patronage.

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

* JBS

Call For Papers
Bengali Theatre: Bengalis and Theatre
"The really conspicuous talent for histrionic art possessed by the Bengali, cannot be seen to better advantage than in this drama." -The Englishman (1873)
7th December 1872 was a historic day for Bengali Theatre as well as the socio-cultural spectrum of India as the nation witnessed the inception of a public theatre with the staging of Nildorpon. It was the first time that a public space was thrown wide open to the common masses in lieu of ticket and not on the basis of class, caste, creed, race, religion or gender. Every inhabitant of Bengal was welcome in the playhouse, which would now be the site of mass agitation, nationalist revolutionary awakening and cultural-spiritual cultivation in the coming decades.
Dinabandhu Mitra’s Nildorpon (translated by Michael Madhusudan Dutt as Indigo Mirror) signaled a new herald of nationalism that swept the Bengali stage to evolve into a potent weapon of protest against the British colonialism. The legacy of Bankimchandra Chattopadhyay in Bengali literature was carried on by the likes of the "Shakespeare of India", Girish Chandra Ghosh who pioneered modern play writing in Bengali. Soon, the Bengali stage acquired importance beyond socio-economic and cultural boundaries as spiritual leaders like Ramakrishna Paramhamsa patronized it and the British rulers despised it by drafting one coercive legislation after another.
The immortal words of Ramkrishna,"Theatre e lokshikkhe hoi" (Theatre provides mass enlightenment) catapult theatre from the mud of rich man’s entertainment and forced prostitution of actresses like Binodini by patrons to an aesthetic art form with an immense potential to influence people, that was evident in case of Binodini playing Sri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu in Girish Ghosh's theatre. As time progressed, better technology, innovation and indigenous features and an imminent Bengaliness characterized Bengali theatre with the likes of Notosurjo Ahindra Choudhury and Natyacharjo Sisir Kumar Bhaduri coming to the forefront. Tagore's contribution to Bengali theatre was noteworthy too.
During the 1940s, with the advent of Leftist ideology in theatre, nationalism took a back-seat; anti imperial struggle was displaced and sabotaged under the name of class struggle in renowned plays like Nobanno. IPTA became the buzzword and Bengali theatre appeared in new avatars like Gononatyo, Nobonatyo and finally to the present form of Group Theatre. It has changed parallel to the change in Bengali society, values, norms, ideologies.
The present issue would like to throw open arguments, broadly regarding the change in Bengali theatre from its glorious nationalistic beginnings to the domination of leftist ideology and to what extent this has affected Bengali theatre and its environment.
The topics for contribution will include the following sub-themes but will not be exclusively limited to the same:
Sub themes
1. Bengali theatre and society.
2. Nationalist/Revolutionary awakening & Bengali theatre.
3. Bengali drama and Bengali language, culture, politics and history.
4. Bengali literature and Bengali theatre: Bankim, Sharat, Tagore et al.
5. Economics, publicity and stagecraft of Bengali theatre.
6. Issues & subjects of Bengali theatre.
7. Bengali influence on Indian and world theatre (on the plays in languages other than Bengali).
8. Leftist ideology in Bengali theatre.
9. The legendary commercial-popular theatre of Bengal. Group theatre movement.
10. Contemporary Bengali theatre.
11. Women in Bengali theatre.
12. The relation of Bengali theatre to the traditional performing arts of Bengal, like dance, Jatra, Kobigaan etc.
(the authors are encouraged to extend beyond the given theme and sub themes)
 
General details about submissions to Journal of Bengali Studies:

Journal of Bengali Studies is published in English and is an online journal. A Contribution must be electronic and in English language. It should consistently follow any one of these three scholarly styles of citation: MLA style, Chicago Manual of Style and APA style. Contributions must always be double spaced. An article, with notes and bibliography, should not be more than 10000 words. In case of reviews, the upper limit is 2000 words; we welcome reviews of new books as well as old and out of print ones, not necessarily of books written in English alone; we accept reviews of old and new plays alike, as well as reviews of theatre related books, new and old alike.
From our Cinema issue, we have started a section (in addition to articles and reviews) called Creative Workshop: Theory in Practice. This section features creative writings which are related to our theme. Any kind of creative writing that concerns the relationship between Bengalis and Theatre is welcome for this issue; a priority may be given to maiden theatre scripts, which may be originally written in Bengali, in which case it has to be in English translation, or it may be originally written in English. In either case, it should touch our theme and be relevant to the CFP; for example, a meta-theatrical play about Bengalis and theatre (immediately coming to mind is Utpal Dutt's Tiner Toloyar) would be very much welcome. So will be any play that explores the question of Bengaliness. Upper Limit of Creative Workshop: 10000 words.
We have no lower word limit for the contributions, the authors are free to use their discretion. Contributions should either be in MS Word, Open Office, or RTF format and should be emailed to editorbengalistudies@gmail.com, editjbs@gmail.com and shoptodina@gmail.com.

Before submission, please see our Submission Guidelines and Terms and Conditions for further details at http://bengalistudies.blogspot.in/. For further ideas about the objectives of our journal, please see the JBS Manifesto at http://bengalistudies.blogspot.in/.

Editor: Tamal Dasgupta
Editorial Board: Sourav Gupta , Rishi Ghosh, Sandeep Chatterjee, Mousumi Biswas Dasgupta, Sujay Chatterjee.
For this Theatre issue of JBS, Sourav Gupta (09938902001) and Rishi Ghosh (09804230995) will be Executive Editors.

Sunday, October 28, 2012

* The Garden




On 12th and 13th October, 2012, St. Anthony’s High School and St. Joseph Nursery and Kindergarten, in association with TTIS, presented their School Concert. Visit: http://antlit.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-garden.html